Tuesday, September 23, 2008

Troy Chapman on National Public Radio

We have some very exciting news... On Sunday, Sept. 28 somewhere around 9:30-10:00 a.m. ET, Troy Chapman can be heard reading his essay for the "This I Believe" radio series during Weekend Edition Sunday on National Public Radio.

"This I Believe is an international project engaging people in writing, sharing, and discussing the core values that guide their daily lives. These short statements of belief, written by people from all walks of life, are archived here and featured on public radio in the United States and Canada, as well as in regular broadcasts on NPR. The project is based on the popular 1950s radio series of the same name hosted by Edward R. Murrow." (—from the series Web site)

Troy joins others whose essays have been produced for radio, including authors, artists, musicians, statesmen and -women, academics, entertainers, and many more who are unknown outside their circle of family, friends and associates.

Click here for a list of local affiliates if you don't know where NPR is on your dial. If you miss Troy's piece or want to hear it again, after the broadcast date you'll find a page containing the essay and a link to listen here. You might want to take some time reading and listening to other essays — such meaningful and thoughtful statements from people in all walks of life are good for the soul.

Our sincerest thanks to series staff, especially senior editor Viki Merrick and curator Jay Allison, for choosing Troy's essay for broadcast and the extra work they did with the prison to record him. Also many thanks to administrators at Kinross Correctional Facility, who not only gave permission for Troy to participate in the series, but facilitated the timely recording of his essay.

Please leave a comment after you've listened... we'd love to hear what you think!

—Maryann Gorman

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Lovely piece. Thankyou for sharing it with us. I used to visit a long term health care facility with my dog. One day an old man asked, "What's his name?" The nurses told me that it was the first sentence this man had uttered in two years.

Anonymous said...

A beautiful and powerful piece. How true it is that the human soul can neither heal nor flourish if it does not have the opportunity to care for others...

Rosemary said...

Two comments: I hope Mr. Chapman is working on a memoir as well as the blog. Publishers, take note!

The story about the cat was most affecting and telling. What bothers me is that the prison took the cat away. That cat was better than any programs they had. I have read of established programs in prisons--well, at least one--that have had prisoners take care of animals. As happened here, prisoners learned to care not only for the animals but for other humans--and themselves. In addition, they learned job skills in grooming and other kinds of animal care. Why doesn't every prison do this?

Janice said...

The comments of Troy are much appreciated. I have been employed at the prison he is a resident of and his statements regarding care of others and something are true. This is a most habilitating experience. Many persons incarcerated learn empathy for others in caring for something. I happen to know that Troy has ministered to many others who are like himself incarcerated. He is a fine example of the cahracter of Jesus. Elgie Dow

Anonymous said...

God bless you Troy. You are proof of the redemptive power of service to others no matter the species. Thanks for the reminder.

marimbadog said...

I listened to and read Troy's essay this evening on the NPR website and I wanted to thank Troy for writing and recording it. As is so often true of Troy's work, this gave me something both very spiritual and practical to carry into the many roles I play in my life, including husband, father, son, brother, friend and more. I appreciate these thoughts very much.

Rich

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for recording your cat story. I loved everything about it. the message, the humility in how you told it. And most of all I loved that I could hear your compassion for yourself and your fellow prisoners. And so, somehow, for me. Ot made me cry.

Chris Giesler said...

Thanks so very much for this profound essay, Troy. You have struck a chord that lies deep within all of us. I work with youth on a daily basis and find that they also respond best when they are asked to help others. Thanks again for your very good work. I wish you well and will keep you in my prayers. Chris Giesler, Bethelehem, PA

Anonymous said...

There’s grace in being able – in the midst of ongoing difficulty – to see, and even more, to appreciate, the fleeting gift of that cat.

To be able to express it so beautifully as well; it's a message for me, and I'm sure, for others. We do all need to be needed.

Thank you.

Missy said...

My daughter is an intelligent, creative beautiful young lady who just spent four days in a local jail for assault. She has made many positive changes in her life but still needs to work through anger issues. Her stint in a local jail has helped her to realize her issue is a serious one.
Your essay could not have come at a more pertinent time for us. I will share it with her and your blog as well.
Your essays can help her realize that a momentary fit of rage can have lifetime consequences.

Anonymous said...

I listened to Troy reading his essay after I had already read it; it was so powerful I cried. I volunteer with the County Animal Shelter and I have seen the difference an animal can make in a person's life and vice versa. I hope for success in getting Troy released.

Anonymous said...

I am a regular NPR listener and was deeply moved by Troy's essay...one of the best I have ever heard. I work in law enforcement...it is humbling to hear his observations about the power of this orange cat over compared to programs developed by educated professionals and something I will keep in mind as I continue in my career.

Anonymous said...

I am profoundly moved by the essay, and the beauty of its craft. Approaching my mid-40's, I've become a mother for the first time. After decades of chasing the perfect romance, an education, travel, the ideal job, the promotion and big paycheck, I felt somehow empty. Life had evolved for me as a rather solo venture, albeit with rewards. With the odds stacked against me, and at significant health risk, I ventured towards parenthood alone. God graced me with my daughter's birth last year. The profound impact of her need for me, and mine for her has awakened a side of living I could never have imagined. I have not been able to describe it accurately despite my efforts. Only Troy's essay has been able to capture this. It brought me to tears. Thank you for the gift.

Heather said...

I only just heard this on an NPR podcast and, like many others here, it made me cry. My husband and I foster cats with the humane society - we currently have nine strays in our home - and I thought a lot about the difference that could be made in the world if more people could learn the compassion and empathy that Troy and the other inmates displayed thanks to a mangy stray cat. Thank you, and God bless you.